566

Aromex (Exemestane)

$79.00

Manufacturer: Alpha Pharma
Category: Anti Estrogens
Substance: Exemestane
Package: 25mg (30 pills)

Product Description

Exemestane (trade name Aromasin) is a drug used to treat breast cancer. It is a member of the class of drugs known as aromatase inhibitors. Some breast cancers require estrogen to grow. Those cancers have estrogen receptors (ERs), and are called ER-positive. They may also be called estrogen-responsive, hormonally-responsive, or hormone-receptor-positive. Aromatase is an enzyme that synthesizes estrogen. Aromatase inhibitors block the synthesis of estrogen. This lowers the estrogen level, and slows the growth of cancers.
Medical uses
Exemestane is indicated for the adjuvant treatment of postmenopausal women with estrogen-receptor positive early breast cancer who have received two to three years of tamoxifen and are switched to it for completion of a total of five consecutive years of adjuvant hormonal therapy. US FDA approval was in October 2005.

Exemestane is also indicated for the treatment of advanced breast cancer in postmenopausal women whose disease has progressed following tamoxifen therapy.

Contraindications
The drug is contraindicated in premenopausal women, which of course includes pregnant and lactating women.

Adverse effects
The most common side effects (more than 10% of patients) are hot flashes and sweating, which are typical of estrogen deficiency as caused by exemestane, and also insomnia, headache, and joint pain. Nausea and fatigue are mainly observed in patients with advanced breast cancer.

Overdose
Single doses of up to at least 32-fold (800 mg), as well as continuous therapy with 24-fold (600 mg) the usual daily dose are well tolerated. No life-threatening overdosing is known in humans, but only in animal studies with 2000- to 4000-fold doses (adjusted to body surface area).

Interactions
Exemestane is metabolized by the liver enzyme CYP3A4. While the CYP3A4 inhibitor ketoconazole had no significant effect on exemestane levels in a clinical trial, the strong CYP3A4 inductor rifampicin significantly cut exemenstane levels about in half (AUC −54%, Cmax −41% for a single dose), potentially compromising its effectiveness. Other 3A4 inductors such as carbamazepine and St John’s Wort are expected to have similar effects. The clinical relevance of this effect has not been investigated.

Estrogens probably reduce exemestane effectiveness: It would usually be counter-productive to reduce the body’s estrogen synthesis with exemestane and then substitute estrogen with pharmaceuticals.

Pharmacology
Mechanism of action
Exemestane is an oral steroidal aromatase inhibitor that is used in ER-positive breast cancer in addition to surgery and/or radiation in post-menopausal women.

The main source of estrogen is the ovaries in premenopausal women, while in post-menopausal women most of the body’s estrogen is produced via the conversion of androgens into estrogen by the aromatase enzyme in the peripheral tissues (i.e. adipose tissue like that of the breast) and a number of sites in the brain. Estrogen is produced locally via the actions of the aromatase enzyme in these peripheral tissues where it acts locally. Any circulating estrogen in post-menopausal women as well as men is the result of estrogen escaping local metabolism and entering the circulatory system.

Exemestane is an irreversible, steroidal aromatase inactivator of type I, structurally related to the natural substrate 4-androstenedione. It acts as a false substrate for the aromatase enzyme, and is processed to an intermediate that binds irreversibly to the active site of the enzyme causing its inactivation, an effect also known as “suicide inhibition.” By being structurally similar to enzyme targets, exemestane permanently binds to the enzymes, preventing them from converting androgen into estrogen.

Type II aromatase inhibitors such as anastrozole and letrozole, by contrast, are not steroids and work by interfering with the aromatase’s heme.

The estrogen suppression rate for exemestane varies from 35% for estradiol (E2) to 70% for estrone (E1).

Pharmacokinetics
Exemestane is quickly absorbed from the gut, but undergoes a strong first-pass effect in the liver. Highest blood plasma concentrations are reached after 1.2 hours in breast cancer patients and after 2.9 hours in healthy subjects. Maximal aromatase inhibition occurs after two to three days. 90% of the absorbed substance are bound to plasma proteins. The liver enzyme CYP3A4 oxidizes the methylidene group in position 6, and the 17-keto group (on the five-membered ring) is reduced by aldo-keto reductases to an alcohol. Of the resulting metabolites, 40% are excreted via the urine and 40% via the feces within a week. The original substance accounts for only 1% of excretion in the urine. The terminal half-life is 24 hours.